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susanvoss18

susanvoss18

Shadows of Glass

Shadows of Glass - Kassy Tayler Book 1 left us with Wren and her whole village scampering before a deluge of water. Wren, Pace, and a few Shiners find themselves outside the Dome via the underground tunnels. They also find that a lot of people didn’t survive the disaster. On top of mourning their dead, they must also get use to fresh air, wildlife, sunlight, and the elements. It soon becomes clear that they are not alone in the outside world as the Rovers are clearly interested in their goats and ponies. Luckily, some generous and helpful Americans descend in an airship, very intrigued by the smoke that continues to pour from the holes in the Dome. The Shiners easily make friends with the Hatfields (Jane & Lion and their daughter Xanth and her cousin Levi) and their well-stocked airship.

Wren has Shiner eyes, eyes that have evolved to low-light environments. And she makes the mistake of looking into the sun. Drama ensues. Everyone’s emotions are running high as those who made it out with Pace and Wren deal with the dead, or worse, the not knowing if loved are are alive, trapped, or dead and lost. James, ever the divisive force, and Pace square off while Wren feels torn between her remaining people and the bond she has with Pace. More drama.

Then the airship shows up and Wren is the first to stumble upon it. Luckily, the occupants are friendly and have extra resources. They trade Wren a grand meal in exchange for knowledge of the Dome and the surrounding area. Xanth takes to her right away, making sure she is bathed and dressed. Pretty soon, the remaining Shiners are taken under the protective wing of the Hatfields. They begin training on simple weapons, like bows, and also hunting.

Between the action scenes, we are treated to Wren’s inner turmoil. She’s had a lot of deal with and with no chance to rest. She is especially torn by her ability to kill, constantly questioning the morality of it. Luckily, Levi can relate, and the two start to form a bond. And yet more drama ensues as Pace and Levi vie for Wren’s affections.

There were many things I was taken with in this story. I love the idea of folks stuck in an enclosed environment, losing much of their knowledge of the surrounding world, and then coming out into that world. for instance, Pace was privileged in that he had access to numerous books. So he is able to figure out how to dig up muscles, cook them, and eat them. They all learn about sunburns and the Shiners have to take extra care with their eyes that are evolved for miner life. The American explorers and their airship was a nice touch, even if they are a little too nice and polite to be real. Still, they have an airship! And they bring knowledge of the bigger world.

Wren has so much to deal with, and by and large, she does a really good job. She helped many of the remaining Shiners when they first emerged from the caves. Then she spread the world about the Rovers so folks could keep an eye out. Then the airship brings much needed protection but also complications. They wish to make contact with those inside. While Wren worries for her friends who still remain inside, she doesn’t want to return.

But then it all gets complicated with the love triangle. You won’t give me the evil squinty eye if I tell you I kind of tuned out some of it because it was overkill? Wren acts like she doesn’t have any control over her emotions, which leads to lack of control over her actions. She also can’t decide what she wants. I didn’t really care for these dramatic sections of the book, but I guess they are required in modern-day Young Adult. Sigh…..

Levi is half Sioux, thought he doesn’t really look it. There are a few sections where he goes on about how much he learned during his single year with his mother’s tribe. This seemed to smack of putting the noble savage on a pedestal. Native Americans are real today and haven’t been lost to the mists of time. And they are supposedly real in this book too, still having healthy societies. Perhaps we could have had a Native American family piloting the airship? Just a thought. In case an author is looking for a new, crisp idea that hasn’t been explored/exploited.

The bad guys were terribly easy to spot. They all smelled bad, looked bad, and acted badly. I was hoping that the Rovers would have some sort of society as they managed to exist outside the Dome all these years through the calamity of the comet. But no, rather they all fell into this cookie cutter mold of ‘Bad Guy’. On the other hand, several got to die during the action scenes which provided an opportunity for character growth by our heroes.

OK, with those few criticisms, I still enjoyed the book. I want Wren to succeed and I want Pace to get his mom back. I want James to die a glorious death instead of being a dick all the time. Levi and his family are cool and helpful, but soon they will lose interest and fly away. So, yeah, I will probably check out the third book because I need to know how things end.

The Narration: Nicola Barber was the perfect voice for Wren. Her various accents (the Shiners, Pace’s, the Rovers, the Americans) were are done quite well. Her ability to pour Wren’s emotions through the narration was excellent.